Cinnamon Tree Organics single origin organic black peppercorns 1.25Oz
Cinnamon Tree Organics Single origin organic black peppercorns
Cinnamon Tree Organics single origin organic black peppercorns 3.5Oz
Cinnamon Tree Organics Organic black peppercorns

Organic Black Peppercorns


*Our farmer in Sri Lanka is working on this year's harvest from June through August and we will have fresh stocks by September. Please sign up above to be notified when we restock and in the meantime, check out our ground black pepper.

"I don't usually think about black pepper as having any flavor. I think 'oh, it's just black pepper,' but this is some REALLY GOOD black pepper! Really good." — Cristin Cooper, Coop's Soups, Olney, MD.

Cristin pretty much sums it up. All black pepper is not created equal. We work with our farmer, Mr. Sharala, to secure fresh harvests and transport it using the shortest supply chain. So the natural oils that give black pepper (Piper nigrum) its intense flavor is still intact and ready to blow you away!

Tasting notes of cayenne, ginger root and tropical heat.

  • USDA certified-organic
  • Grown in the central hills of Sri Lanka
  • Naturally dried in the tropical sun

"I was like, well, maybe it's not going to be any different. What do I know? And it's unbelievable." — Michael Protas, Owner, One Acre Farm, Dickerson, MD

How to use

You use black pepper every day, but if you haven't tried whole peppercorns before, get a grinder, because you're missing out!

  • Add whole to soups and grains like rice and quinoa as they boil
  • Add as the secret ingredient in our turmeric rice, chai tea and turmeric latte
  • Grind fresh onto salads and pasta
  • Cacio e pepe! Need we say more? (Here's a recipe from Bon Appetit)
  • Grind onto fresh fruit: try on almost-ripe mango, apple, pineapple, melons and ripe jackfruit — you'll never eat fruit any other way again!

Harvesting details

Our farmer, Mr. Sharala, grows his black pepper alongside Ceylon cinnamon in the central hills of Sri Lanka. During the harvesting season between June and August every year, he watches for the berries to start ripening and turning red. This is how he knows it's time to send the pickers up ladders to handpick the berries individually.

Once harvested, the crop is sorted, cleaned and laid out to dry in the intense tropical sun. Basking in the heat, the berries turn dark brown and gain its signature wrinkles, sealing in the flavors.